Image from HuggingTweets based on the prompt “I am”

My afternoon with HuggingTweets

Recently, a friend introduced me to HuggingTweets: A product demo built by Boris Dayma of HuggingFace that allows you to train a language model based on your favorite Twitter account and to generate new tweets based on a given prompt. As a person who will take any test and explore any technology that promises to give me some insight into my personality or myself (from the whole gamut of personality tests available online and in my alma mater’s career development center to the most questionable of astrological insights), I obviously chose to create a model based on my own tweets.


Photo by Zdeněk Macháček on Unsplash

A poem about becoming a mother

Quickly, everything becomes
my cat asleep in my pillowcase
and having nothing left to do
but watch the stillness of the room
in the doldrum white-noise hum
of several rooftop HVAC units
so tireless in their endless fight

against the climate. My hair lifts
with the reach of waiting and
my knuckles still burning from
the spaces made amid (paper-
thin) walls too weak to carry

so many knickknacks,
so much free time,
all the false starts.

But when the past dissipates again becomes a muted thing and the ring on my finger reminds how none will change except —…


Photo by Jess Bailey on Unsplash

How working as an editor has made me a better data scientist

I was initially attracted to data science because of its incredible potential to solve a plurality of complex problems, and I think the same is true of many people working as data scientists today. Given almost any problem, a dataset can be assembled through which insight can be gleaned and a solution developed. Quite appropriately, therefore, data scientists are a wildly diverse bunch that is perhaps best characterized by an insatiable curiosity and a passion for problem-solving — and I think that is the field’s greatest strength.

Despite the diversity of my peers, however, as I reenter the job market…


Photo by Lina Trochez on Unsplash

…and how I am finding my way back

Henry was mystified by my new pages. Was it more than brocade, he asked, more than beautiful language?… Then he said, as everybody else has said, “Well, you should give a clue, you should lead up to it; we are thrown into the strangeness unexpectedly. This must be read a hundred times.”

“Who is going to read it a hundred times?” I said sadly. But then I thought of Ulysses and the studies which accompany it… Here, I faced my lifelong problem. I wanted to go on in that abstract, intense way, but could anyone bear it? Hugo understood it…


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How language can be used to both identify and obscure

Like the northeastern girl, there are thousands of girls scattered throughout the tenement slums, vacancies in beds in a room, behind the shop counters working to the point of exhaustion. They don’t realize how easily substitutable they are and that they could just as soon drop off the face of the earth. Few protest and as far as I know they never complain since they don’t know to whom. Does this whom exist?

The Hour of the Star by Clarice Lispector (translated by Benjamin Moser)

(Observing from the) background

I have a strange, voyeuristic fascination with reading the responses to tweets and other forms…


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An ethical framework for natural language applications

Note: Although this article is written as a five-part series, it is not necessary to read each part in order, nor is it necessary to read all parts, as each part has been written as a standalone piece.

Introduction

In Part III of this series (linked below), inspired by a quote from Deep Learning with PyTorch (further below), to build toward propositions for (1) verified humans on social media platforms and (2) transparency regarding the use of language models to generate text, I discussed the possibility of a machine forming a thesis by exploring both mechanical desires and algorithmically generated worldviews.


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An Argument for Verified Humans (Part III)

Note: Although this article is written as a five-part series, it is not necessary to read each part in order, nor is it necessary to read all parts, as each part has been written as a standalone piece.

Introduction

In Part II of this series (linked below), inspired by a quote from a guidebook called Deep Learning with PyTorch (further below), I explored the changing nature of communication with human language to build toward propositions for (1) verified humans on social media platforms and (2) transparency regarding the use of language models to generate text.

In this article, to answer the…


Photo by Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash

An Argument for Verified Humans (Part II)

Note: Although this article is written as a five-part series, it is not necessary to read each part in order, nor is it necessary to read all parts, as each part has been written as a standalone piece.

Introduction

In Part I of this series (linked below), inspired by a quote from a guidebook called Deep Learning with PyTorch (further below), I embarked on a journey toward propositions for (1) verified humans on social media platforms and (2) transparency regarding the use of language models to generate text by discussing the unimportance of the semantic classification of the actions and capabilities…


Photo by Marat Gilyadzinov on Unsplash (Author’s note: In either Autumn or Winter of his Seasons Quartet, Karl Ove Knausgaard supposes the hypothetical life of the human brain, removed from the confines of the skull, as an independent organism; he suggests that the brain would be a sea creature not unlike a jellyfish, with nerves like tentacles floating behind it. I liked the imagery evoked by supposing this strange yet familiar creature, as well as the implied importance of anatomy, for if our brains were not given our bodies, what good would they be? — and so is it the body that defines want, and the brain a servant of the body? — and so what can we make of a neural network?)

An Argument for Verified Humans (Part I)

Note: Although this article is written as a five-part series, it is not necessary to read each part in order, nor is it necessary to read all parts, as each part has been written as a standalone piece.

Introduction

As I read, I often get lost in the text, my thoughts diverging from the author’s words toward something related yet different. This process seems almost like a conversation between the author and me, with a person’s words provoking my response. At times, I enjoy this aspect of reading, but more often, it is quite distracting.

Still, if I find the thoughts…


Photo by Possessed Photography on Unsplash

Artificial Intelligence, Machine Intelligence, Opinion

What do we question when we ask if machines can think?

An interesting concept from literary theory states that if a reader wants to make sense of a text, then he will find an interpretation of that text that is consistent with his own world view, or perhaps more precisely, with his view of the world he supposes the text to concern. Oftentimes, to fulfill such a desire requires the reader to fill gaps in his own knowledge, as well as gaps in the logic or rhetoric of the writer by reading between the lines.

Danielle Boccelli

MSc Analytics ’16 @ Georgia Tech | BSc ChemEng ’15 @ Drexel U | @danielleboccell

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